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Ready for a Move to the Country in Clark County Washington? Some Considerations

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Your hearing the call of the wild, longing for the peace and quiet of a home in a rural, country, or natural setting, and we don’t blame you. At ViewHomes of Clark County these types or properties are our specialty. Moving to a ViewHome with nature as neighbors is a great adventure and can be good for your mind, body, and spirit. However, it isn’t necessarily the best fit for everyone. Here are some considerations to see if you’d be a good match. 

Commute Times: If you’re required to travel to a job, the commute time is worth thinking about prior to make the move. We often tell our prospective buyers to drive the route a few times. Driving fifteen miles in the country is slower than driving fifteen miles on a major thoroughfare. The upside, the roads are often scenic and enjoyable. 

Shops and Services: If you like being close to everything, a rural home might not be the best fit. It’s not likely you’ll be able to run to the store for a quick gallon of milk, or pop-out for a quick pizza and beer at the corner pub. The upside, you learn to plan ahead – and when you do have an evening out for pizza – it’s a true treat. 

Utilities:

Storms often create power outages, therefore homes in rural areas often have back-up generators, or at the very least, an alternative heat source such as a wood stove. It’s one thing to go without electricity for a few hours or days, but quite another to go without heat.

Many of the rural homes in Clark County Washington are located in areas without Natural Gas lines. Therefore, if you want the convenience of a gas fireplace, or enjoy using a gas oven and/or cooking stove, you’ll need to opt for propane.

Internet and cell service isn’t always guaranteed either. If TV is a big deal for you, or internet service for working at home, it’s important to investigate the reliability of service prior to buying.

Many homes in the country have wells and septic systems. It’s important to due diligence on the condition of both when you’re looking at a property to buy. Once it’s yours – it’s important to follow the required maintenance and testing schedules. 

The upside – you have a lot more control over your life and living independently and sustainably.

Wide Open Spaces:

If you’re the one who loves to host progressive dinners or block parties, a lack of close proximity to neighbors could be a problem. Will you be happy living twenty to thirty minutes ( or more ) away from the nearest mall, restaurant, movie theater or sports field?

The upside – a sense of community. The people you do meet will be a great network for support and advice regarding the lifestyle.

Neighbors and Freedoms:

Naturally, with land comes some freedoms. There is no HOA in the country telling you where you can park your boat, or RV, or put up a trampoline. However, the same goes for your neighbors. Mutual respect for one another and the enjoyment of soothing views and landscapes should be the goal for all. Realistically, there are some situations where the neighbor may not share the same values. It’s best to scope things out before you make your move. 

Or, your potential neighbors may be far enough away that you won’t be bothered; that also means they might not be available in a true emergency or even when you need a cup of sugar.

The upside – most neighbors in the country know one another’s phone numbers and try to help each other when we can. For example, last year, our neighbor tilled our garden area with his tractor after watching my husband and I struggle with shovels for an hour.

Nature As Neighbors:

Living in the country means paying a great deal of respect to plants, wildlife and your fellow man. Depending on where you’re planning to move, be prepared to share your land—and sometimes the road— with a number of critters such as raccoons and deer, and a myriad of other creatures such as frogs, snakes, and birds.

The upside – We believe organic gardening, a sustainable lifestyle, respect for wildlife and each other – and the planet in general,  is good for all of us, regardless of where we live.

Filed under: Lifestyle | View Homes